South Africa and Britain shared history

South Africa and Britain shared history

South Africa and Britain shared history are both a pain and a blessing to those affected. It started more than 100 years ago when Britain engaged in two wars with Afrikaners (called Boers) in South Africa which resulted in Britain ultimately colonizing South Africa in short. Long after the British left South Africa the two countries are still connected in many ways.

Two sets of whites

Before Britain invaded South Africa the white people in South Africa spoke Afrikaans and were descendants of the Dutch. After the departure of Britain out of South Africa many of the British decided to stay behind in South Africa. This leaves South Africa with two sets of whites – those who speak English and those who speak Afrikaans with very different cultures. While they mostly get along with each other there are also some animosity and also discrimination between the groups.

British influence

Many years after British rule ended South Africa still use and even enjoy some of the things that are from distinctly British. Food – South Africans love their Fish and chips, People and war. We can never get away from the fact that we met each other during war.

War remnants

While many people never visit the war cemeteries, there are however graves of British soldiers buried on South African soil – known as well as unknown. Buildings that were build by Britain. Monuments, Books, Artefacts, Video and Audio footage. Britain on the other hand have their own monuments and things connecting them to South Africa. One of the Boer leader’s named Gideon Scheepers was executed by the British soldiers and his remains taken to Britain – location unknown.

South Africa and Britain shared history

  • South African English are very much British vocabulary.
  • The British monarchy and the Common wealth
  • Shared love of tea with milk
  • Christianity and the Anglican church
  • Music, movies, humour
  • Food: English breakfast, Dunking biscuits in tea, Shepard’s pie, Fish and chips, Steak and kidney pie, Bangers and mash, Sunday roast, Jam roly poly, Marmite, Scones, Christmas pudding, Trifle

South Africa and Britain are forever connected

Amanda Spies du Plessis is the writer and owner of Let’s make tea
as well as the Afrikaans website Amandaskrywer.
Send an e-mail to amandadups(@)gmail.com or go to the contact page and leave a message.

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